Raising Your Overall GPA

Raising your GPA is important for many reasons. It will increase your chances of acceptance into graduate programs and even make you a stronger candidate for a job. Simple math is used to determine your GPA, and simple math can be used to calculate useful projections of your GPA. Generally speaking, the more units you have taken, the harder it will be to make upward movement of your GPA. In some cases, you will need to take many units to raise your GPA to your goal. To maximize your GPA from here on out, you will obviously need to maintain a 4.0GPA (maximum for college scale). If you are unable to maintain a 4.0, any GPA higher than your current GPA will make a smaller positive impact on your GPA.

Here are some examples:

current GPA 2.75 (150 units) : goal=3.00GPA – you would need to maintain a 4.0 GPA for 37.5 units to reach your goal

current GPA 2.75 (50 units) : goal=3.00GPA- you would only need to maintain a 4.0 GPA For 12.5 units to reach your goal

current GPA 2.75 (50 units) : goal=3.00GPA- you would need to maintain a 3.5 GPA For 25 units to reach your goal

current GPA 2.75 (50 units) : goal=3.00GPA- you would need to maintain a 3.1 GPA For 125 units to reach your goal

current GPA 3.5 (180 units) : goal=3.75GPA- you would need to maintain a 4.0 GPA For 180 units to reach your goal

Other example calculations for max possible GPA:

currently have 3.0 (150 units), 50 units remaining – max possible obtainable GPA would be 3.25

currently have 3.5 (200 units), 25 units remaining – max possible obtainable GPA would be 3.56

currently have 2.0 (100 units), 100 units remaining – max possible obtainable GPA would be 3.00

currently have 1.5 (100 units), 150 units remaining – max possible obtainable GPA would be 2.50

You can use pharmapplicant.com’s calculators to make the calculations presented above. Also included is a semester GPA calculator that calculates your overall GPA after this semester’s grades.

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